Monday, October 10, 2011

Times are a Changin'




My Grandpa was one of the most well read, well travelled, and intelligent men that I have ever known. He journeyed the world with an international organization, C.U.S.O, throughout the seventies and eighties to help local people in  second and third world countries improve farming practices. He was always open to learning and progressing as a person, and as an intellect. Well, almost always. He was also a Scotsman: a stubborn Scotsman.


While years passed and farming practices changed, my Grandpa liked to stick to the tried and true, tested method. One year while painting the big shop on the home place, my Uncle hurried along with a huge roller brush. Looking over and seeing Grandpa methodically painting away with a little brush he commented, "Dad, why don't you get a roller like me? It goes way faster."


"This has worked well for me for the past twenty years."






Things did work well for Grandpa over the years.  That's why we never argued with him while he continued to fork feed by hand daily to feed well over a hundred head of cows, while the new front end loader sat in the yard.


As time passed and my Uncle began to farm with Grandpa, Uncle Ian decided it was time for a new combine. Keep in mind this isn't the early 1900's or anything, this was the time of big bangs, probably somewhere in the early 90's.


Grandma loved to tell the story about Grandpa coming in to put his long red underwear on and crawl into his winter coat when the temperature was somewhere near thirty degrees Celsius (mid to high eighties Fahrenheit). Grandma must have thought the stress of harvest was really getting to him, because as much as a person loves heat, it's not exactly common practice to parade around in clothes like that with the warm prairie sun beating down.


My other Grandpa (Larry) farmed the neighboring quarter to Grandpa Bill and couldn't figure out why the combine was working the field with the door hanging open. After he was cornered, and an explanation of his strange behaviour was demanded, we heard something that we would laugh about for years to come. The long underwear and open door were desperate attempts to stay warm in the new combine, one with air conditioning! A luxury Grandpa had never known. He didn't know how to shut it off, and was too stubborn to ask for help!


With harvest 2011 wrapping up for many farmers in the area, I wish you much luck with your air conditioners, not to mention the GPS systems. If you are having trouble, look up my Grandpa Larry, he'll come and help you shut it off and you don't have to be embarrassed by having to ask your son.

14 comments:

Julia said...

What a neat story! I love that your Grandpa didn't ask for help with the A/C....how funny!

~Julia

Lindsay(PACountryCrafts) said...

Soooo funny! I love your stories about your family. It is great to write these down for future generations to enjoy, and I love that you share them with us, too!

LindaG said...

Great story, Cheyenne. Thanks for sharing it with us. :)

Julie Harward said...

Thanks for sharing...my great great grand father was a Scotsman too! ;D

Shirley said...

That's funny! But so typical of his generation. I never knew any of my grandparents, and consider it my loss.

Suzie Salmon said...

What a wonderful family story!!You know Cheyenne, this is the stuff books are made of. When you write one please let me know because I'd love to read it!

Anna said...

What a cute story!! I hope you're doing wonderful!

fernvalley01 said...

What a great story! I always have trouble with the A/C on the tractor, usually give up and oopen a window!

Grandma K said...

I so love these bits of history. Thanks for sharing them!

Gumbo Lily said...

Great story, Cheyenne! I love stories like this. I know a person or two that lives up north like we do and they talk about hardly being "thawed out" in July, so I understand Grandpa's need to keep warm. He needed to "store up" a little heat for the coming winter.

Jody

A Prairie Girl in California said...

I love this story:)

Libbie said...

Cheyenne I love so much that you know these fun stories about your family..I am wishing so bad I could get my mom to journal smoe stories of growing up & of my dad growing up. The best treasures of all!

Too funny..your grandpas even make me smile!

the said...

i can just about picture it! thanx for the story chey, once again you remind me of Grandma Betty and Grandpa Bill who loved a good story, and didn't mind one being told on them. thanx for keeping their memory alive.
juanita

Tara /cinnamon & post said...

Adorable. I too hold onto the old-fashioned way of doing things. I think it is why I love handmade so much and keep saying a definitive no to the wii.

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